USA 1965 Gemini 4

Gemini 4 (GT-4), launched on June 3, 1965, was the second Gemini manned flight crewed by James A. McDivitt and Edward H. White II. The highlight of the mission was the first American extra-vehicular activity (EVA) (or known as “space walk”), during which White remained tethered outside the spacecraft for 22 minutes. NASA moved up the “space walk” schedule after Soviet cosmonaut, Alexei Leonov, performed the first ever EVA on March 18 1965. Gemini 4 was the first multi-day space flight by the US to show that it was possible for humans to remain in space for the length of time required to fly to the moon and back.

Gemini 4 "Orbit Covers" signed by James McDivitt and Edward White.

Gemini 4 Celestial cachet, signed by James McDivitt & Edward White.

Gemini 4 launch cover cancelled at Cape Canaveral.

Gemini 4 was the first flight to be controlled by the new Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas.

Gemini 4 tracking station at Antigua

Another objective of the mission was to rendezvous and fly in formation with the spent second stage of its Titan II booster rocket. However the crew found it difficult to target the stage due to the lack of depth perception and with no radar on board. After several attempts to get closer and with half the thruster fuel spent, the crew finally gave up and focus on the more important EVA objective. The rendezvous objective was achieved successfully in later Gemini mission by Wally Schirra commanding Gemini 6A in December.

USS Wasp prime recovery ship cover, signed by Edward White and James McDivitt.

A rare, unnumbered Beck printed cachet cover for Gemini 4 PRS USS Wasp.

A pair of Gemini 4 captain's cover, signed by Edward White and James McDivitt.

Gemini 4 "Orbit Covers" (with Cape Canaveral postmark on recovery date) signed by James McDivitt and Edward White.